Posts Tagged ‘health’

Healthy Vacations

Monday, June 13th, 2016

by Sheila Kalas, master trainer and owner of Fitness Plus

Sheila Kalas, master trainer and owner of Fitness Plus in Lexington, Kentucky

Although vacations are supposed to be about relaxation, they don’t have to be about laziness and/or decadence. Gaining weight on a vacation is not unusual, but it doesn’t have to be a given.

First, and most important, is your attitude. If your mindset is that you can eat and drink whatever you want because you’re on vacation, then you will probably gain weight when you are on vacation.

I believe that it is important to use your vacation as a release from your normal daily grind. I don’t believe that all of your releases have to be things that will cause you undo stress when you return. Negative things, such as spending too much money or gaining too much weight will undoubtedly cause you stress. This is not a positive outcome: enjoying yourself for a week or two, only to be stressed for several months afterwards.

Instead of looking at your vacation as a time to let loose in ways that may affect your life negatively, try letting loose in more positive ways. For example, think about vacation as a time of exploration through activity. Whether you are planning a trip to a city or to a more rural location, you can spend many hours, and walk many miles, exploring your surroundings. Any trip can be turned into a “moving vacation” filled with exploration.

The best way to ensure that you will be able to explore your surroundings in a safe and effective manner is to do a little planning. Just arriving at a place you have never been before and having no idea what you will have access to could be a recipe for disaster. Take a little time to learn a little about the geography of where you are going. Make sure you know if your accommodations are near or far from main points of interest and if they are in a safe area. It doesn’t matter if you are traveling to New York City, Napa Valley or Budapest, Hungary, a good travel agent can help you find accommodations that will be conducive to walking, running, cycling, etc. If you want special equipment, like bicycles, then make sure you know how and where to rent them.

A mid-point between the specialized touring trip and the self-guided trip is the private guided walking tour. Most major tourist destinations will have private guides available. Hiring a guide for one day will not break the bank and will give you a great insider’s look and education of your surroundings. The private aspect of this is very valuable; you can gain a lot of local knowledge regarding non-tourist eateries, pubs, and sights. One good day of a private guided tour will give you several more days of meaningful self-exploration.

Getting up every day and exploring your surroundings in an active way is a very gratifying way to spend your vacation. You will feel infinitely more connected to your destination seeing it through daily walks and exploration, and it is a way to become much more of a local than you ever could just riding in cabs or on buses.

Don’t just go on a trip, experience it! Getting out of the cab and off the bus and walking or riding through a new place is the way to do this.

Besides increasing your activity on vacation, you can also see it as an opportunity to better control your eating. In reality, most people eat less frequently on vacation than they do at home. Notice I said less frequently, not less quantity. On vacation, most people eat three meals, or even two, a day. On vacation, access to food is less than at home. Without your own kitchen, the ability to sit and snack is less, especially at night. On vacation, when dinner is over and you retire to your room, that’s it. Even if there is a mini bar with a few incredibly expensive snacks, most people do not sit in bed and eat chips or cookies; they go to bed.

On vacation, you are not surrounded with cabinets and refrigerators full of tempting food. It makes sense to try and capitalize on this reality. Since you will not be as tempted to eat in between meals, all you have to do is get in the mindset to make better choices at the meals you do have.

Your activity level will be up, because you are busy exploring your surroundings, and you are not snacking, so you certainly can eat a hearty meal, just make it healthy. Again, vacation is very conducive to this. Most areas that tourists frequent have a higher quality of food and more fresh food choices than chain restaurants. Take advantage of the variety and freshness of foods we find in tourist locations. Try new things, experience new meats, veggies and salads.

Eating healthy portions of good food will not cause you to gain weight on vacation. Eating the same junk food you find at home or bringing your own snacks with you to fill up your hotel room will. Don’t go on vacation just to eat fast food—what a waste. Use vacation as a time to expand your palate and enjoy fresh food at a slow pace. Remember what it is like to enjoy the act of eating again.

Normal healthy eating and moderate regular activity is a springboard to a healthier you, both at home and on vacation.

Vitamin Sea

Invest in Yourself

Sunday, March 27th, 2016

by Sheila Kalas, master trainer and owner of Fitness Plus

Sheila Kalas, master trainer and owner of Fitness Plus in Lexington, KentuckyDo you have some type of plan for financing your retirement? We understand that money invested early in life will pay benefits later in life. Even if it is painful at the time, saving and investing money when you are young will increase the quality of your life in later years.

Now, have you thought about those exact same principles in relation to exercise? If you haven’t, then it is time that you do. When it comes to “investing now for future benefits,” exercise and money are a lot alike. If you can start to see exercise as an active investment in your retirement-age health, then you may be much more likely to start and stick with exercise.

When it comes to investing money, the sooner you start, the greater the potential reward. But financial advisers will tell you it’s never too late to start. Is this the same with exercise? Most experts would say yes.

People who moderately exercise throughout their life often have greater “rewards” in their later years, but those who are late starters still reap benefits. In fact, you have a better chance of making up ground with exercise than you do with investing money.

Lifelong exercisers are more likely to avoid conditions such as high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity. However, those who start later and already have one or more of these conditions can often cure themselves of these through exercise.

Exercise is not a guarantee that you will not develop a chronic condition, but there are no guarantees with financial investments either. Do you think you will make more money by NOT investing? Do you think you will see greater results in your body and health by not exercising?

See your body as your most precious commodity, for without it, life is over. Take care of your body and prepare it for retirement like you prepare you bank accounts. Invest in yourself on a regular basis for years and years and you will see the rewards of your efforts. It is not easy and does take discipline, but it is worth it. You are worth it.

Exercise for Independence

Monday, April 13th, 2015

by Sheila Kalas, personal trainer and owner of Fitness Plus

Sheila Kalas, owner of Fitness Plus in Lexington KYExercise is THE best way to ensure that you will remain independent as you age. Why? Because exercise is the key to your mobility. The key to independence is mobility; if you can’t move enough to do daily chores like getting dressed, feeding yourself, going to the store, and taking care of your home, then you will be dependent on someone else to do these things for you. Research indicates that regular exercisers have an average of 9 to 13 more years of independent living than non-exercisers. That’s a great reason to get out there and move.

The first baby boomers turn 69 in 2015 and the youngest boomers are 51 this year. This population is consumed with health, fitness and keeping a good quality of life as they age. They have seen or are seeing their aging parents deteriorate into old age, losing independence and dignity. They are determined not to follow in their parents’ paths.

This is clearly seen in my business of personal training. A large percentage of our clients are baby boomers. On average they workout more consistently than the younger population. They are more interested in exercising for health than they are exercising to look good. They have the right attitude.

Besides helping you keep your independence as you age, regular exercise reduces your chance for every major disease, including diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, risk of stroke, cancer, peripheral artery disease, Alzheimer’s and obesity.

Knowing that just a 30-minute walk a day could greatly reduce your risk for all of these diseases should provide enough reason for you to get out there and do it. No, there is no absolute guarantee that you won’t get or die from these diseases because you exercise. However, the research shows overwhelming evidence that you do reduce risk significantly.

There is also the issue of a condition called “sarcopenia.” This term refers to the age-related loss of muscle mass. Without some kind of weight-bearing exercise to challenge your muscles, your body will begin to lose muscle mass in your 30s. This loss will continue and speed up as you age. Simply lifting weights once or twice a week will stop this process of “rotting” and put you on a path of aging in a healthy, strong, independent manner.

Losing muscle mass also leads to a lower metabolism, making it easier to gain weight. Many people believe that getting old and getting fat are synonymous and that there is no way to avoid this trend. Not so. Intervening with weight training does stop this process and in many cases can reverse it.

Improved self-efficacy is yet another reason to exercise. For the first time, in 2010, the American Psychiatric Association formally recognized exercise as a part of the standard of care recommended for the treatment of depression. Depression is a huge problem in the United States. The statistics on how many people suffer from this disease is staggering. People who participate in regular exercise report a higher level of self-efficacy than those who do not exercise. Several studies show that people who suffer from depression and/or anxiety find marked benefit when exercise is added to their treatment.

These are just some of the reasons to make exercise a regular part of your life. The next time you see an older person who represents where you DON’T want to be when you are that age, burn that image into your mind and recall it every time you are thinking about choosing the couch over your daily walk or run.

Responsibility Plan

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

by Sheila Kalas, personal trainer and owner of Fitness Plus

Sheila Kalas, owner of Fitness Plus in Lexington KYWhen you achieve the goal of accepting total personal responsibility for your health and fitness, you reap rewards.

The first step of accepting responsibility for your health and fitness is the most important. You must admit it: admit that you and only you are responsible for your wellness. This is simple, but not always easy. We are taught to look elsewhere and place blame.

We blame the fast food industry, the advertising industry, for “making” us eat too much junk food. We blame our genetics for our less-than-perfect bodies and for making it impossible to lose weight. We blame our busy lives for never having the time to work out. We even blame our age. If I were only younger I could work out, and on and on.

1. Stopping the blame game is the first step. Stop looking around at other people and other things and using them as excuses to stay unfit, overweight and unhealthy. Once you realize that you have the power to make some positive changes in your life to improve your health and fitness, you will. Keep making excuses and saying that it can’t be done, and you will stay exactly where you are.

Once you have given yourself permission to be in control, you are on your way. So now what?

2. Prioritizing is a great next step. Make a prioritized list of what, in terms of improving health and fitness, you want to do. These priorities should be personal to you, but in step with the goal of improving health and fitness. They should also be specific. A priority like “looking better” is too general and can easily fall out of the health and fitness vein. You can change your hairstyle and look better, but not have improved your health at all.

Common priorities are things like increase cardiovascular fitness, lower cholesterol, improve bone density, reduce back pain, lose weight. Put some thought into your priorities. They are the key to the direction that your journey towards improved health and fitness will take.

Once you have your list of health/fitness priorities, then it is time to make some goals.

3. Any goal is more likely to be achieved if it is based on something that is truly important to you. The priority list helps assure you that the goals are based on things you have identified as being important to you. Goals should also be specific. If one of your priorities is to lose weight, then your goal should say how much and in how much time. You also might have a goal to eat two pieces of fruit a day, instead of high calorie snacks, to help you lose weight; you may have a goal of playing a back pain-free round of golf or lowering your cholesterol by 20 points. Try to make at least one goal for each priority.

Once you have established goals, it is a good idea to put them away for a few days and then review them with a fresh mind. Sometimes you get a little excited when making goals and they drift into the “unattainable” category. This is not good. Goals must be reasonable and attainable. The purpose of goals is to motivate. Establishing unattainable goals with have the opposite effect: it will demoralize you into quitting. Goals should fit your ability and your life. Make sure, when setting goals, you take into account things like work, family, time, budget.

When you have a list of goals that you know are reasonable, attainable (with work, of course), it’s time to make a plan.

4. It is at this stage that you can look to others to help you without feeling like you are giving the responsibility to someone else. When you seek the help of someone else for a plan, e.g., a trainer, a nutritionist or walking partner, AFTER you have established your own priorities and goals, it is an extension of personal responsibility, not a substitute for it.

There is nothing wrong or weak about seeking help to succeed. In fact, this increases your chance for success. Making a plan that will result in reaching your goals requires you to identify the areas in which you need help. You may have a perfectly reasonable goal, such as in increase your core strength, but have no idea how to do it. This does not mean it is a bad goal, it just means that you need help to achieve it. The help in this instance is education and/or instruction.

It is a good plan to hire a qualified trainer to educate you in this area so you can reach your goal. Your plan has to help you reach the goals you have set forth. Your plan may require you to go to a gym, get up earlier to walk before work, change your shopping and eating out habits, among others.

A plan is essential. Don’t just make priorities and goals with no thought of how you are going to achieve them. Goals alone don’t mean anything, it’s how you plan to achieve them that’s important.

5. The last step is simple. Just do it. Put your plan into action. If you have taken the time to follow these steps, then this should be the easy part. Try to remember that the plan you are about to start is something that you designed, based on your life’s priorities.

You are not doing what someone else told you you need to do. You are doing what you decided you need to do. It is always much easier to work on something for yourself than for someone else. This is your plan, so take pride in it, enjoy it and reap the benefits of its brilliant design.

Resolutions

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

by Sheila Kalas, personal trainer and owner of Fitness Plus

Sheila Kalas, owner of Fitness Plus in Lexington KYMost of us have lives that we feel are too busy; we never seem to have the time to finish all the items on our list. So how could we possibly add exercise to our life? Good question.

I cannot argue with the fact that most people are unbelievably busy or that trying to find 30-60 minutes to work out a few days a week can look like an impossible goal.

However, I also know that it is something we have to do.

Not liking exercise, not having the time for exercise, not having exercise as part of your core value system are all valid reasons for not doing it—except for the fact that you still HAVE to.

There is no substitute for exercise, period. It doesn’t matter if you need to lose weight or not, if you are healthy or not, if you are athletic or not, or what age you are; you still have to exercise.

Paying your taxes, taking out the garbage, brushing your teeth, doing your laundry; these are some of things that, as adults, we do, even if we don’t like them. We FIND time to do these things, because we know there are negative consequences if we don’t.

If you love exercise, you won’t put it in the same category as these tedious tasks, but most people do not like exercise. If you don’t, you need to put this in the category of things you don’t like but that you do anyway because you have to, and because of the negative consequences of not doing it.

Maybe the consequences of not exercising are not abrupt enough to get you to action. Maybe you can’t connect the dots of all the medications you take, the extra weight you are carrying around and how lousy you feel, with the fact that you’re not exercising enough. Maybe you don’t care about dying earlier than you should or being completely dependent on others during the last decade of your life because your body has failed you, but the doctors are still keeping alive. I don’t know, but it worries me.

The inactivity of the citizens of this country and the epidemic of obesity is frightening to me. My goal, as a wellness professional, is to try to “open the eyes” of as many people as I can to the idea that moderate, consistent exercise must be part of your life and that all responsible adults should have this as part of their “have to” list of things to be done.

Again, I understand, sympathize and empathize with all who feel too busy to add exercise to your life. If it was easy to get yourself to exercise as much as you should, then there would be little need for the field of personal training (which happens to be one of the fastest-growing professions in our country). It is difficult to overcome inertia and work out; it is difficult to see the time in your busy life it takes; it is difficult to make yet another commitment in your busy life… but you have to.

Please start from this premise: you HAVE to exercise. Start from there and then figure out how you can do it. For many, hiring a personal trainer, making the appointment and putting it in your calendar is the only way it happens. For others, putting together a group of friends to walk with on a daily basis is what works for them. It doesn’t matter how you do it, you just have to do it.

Make a different resolution this year regarding exercise. Don’t make a resolution to DO exercise; make a resolution to realize that you have to do it and that you are going to put it on your list of “have to do, even if I don’t like to do” list and that it has to stay on that list.

Trade Guilt for Goals

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

by Sheila Kalas, personal trainer and owner of Fitness Plus

Sheila Kalas, owner of Fitness Plus in Lexington KYWe live our lives constantly talking about what we “should” do or “have to” do or be doing. I should weed the garden instead of taking a nap; I should clean the house instead of going out to lunch; I have to go to this event, even though I don’t want to, etc. This attitude carries over into health and wellness and, in my opinion, puts a negative spin on the whole process.

When you “have to” do something or feel like you “should” do something, you don’t feel excited about it; it’s a chore. Chores have a negative vibe about them and we all try to figure out a way out of doing them. We use our ability to rationalize to help us feel OK about not doing what we “have” to or “should” do. For example, I know I should take a walk, but it looks like it might rain. Or, I should get the grilled chicken, but this is a special occasion, so the fried chicken is OK.

People are very good at playing this game of rationalizing your way out of should do’s and have to’s to escape regular exercise and a healthy diet. The unfortunate thing is that the only one that is hurt by this behavior is YOU. If you rationalize your way out of exercising (the gym’s too far; it will be too crowded) and a healthy diet (I’ll eat better tomorrow; it’s just one day) it’s you who deal with the consequences of this behavior. Whether weight issues, health issues or both, you have to carry the burden of your behavior.

I would like to give you another perspective that might make it easier to live a more fit and healthy life.

Instead of thinking in the “have to” or “should do” mode, change the paradigm and start thinking in the “who do I want to be” mode.

Stop focusing on what you think you have to do and what you should be and flip it around. Ask yourself what you want to be. What do you want your life to be? What do you want to do to achieve this? Give yourself the control and the power over your choices. Humans like to be in control of their own lives; they generally hate being told what to do.

If you see choices regarding exercise and diet as things that other people are telling you to do, you will be less likely to do them. Instead, if you think about who you want to be and how you want to live your life, you will be more likely to make your own choices to support your desires.

So, who do you want to be? Do you want to be someone that can choose between taking the bus tour through the Tuscan countryside or the walking tour, or do you want to be the person who has no choice but to ride on the bus? Do you want to be the person who can play with your kids/grandkids or do you want to be the person who sits in a chair and watches?

Do you want to be the person that is still active and independent in your 80s and 90s or do you want to be the person in the bed in the nursing home that needs other people to help you dress, eat, etc.?

Who/what you want to be is a very personal choice. You should be the one to make this choice; someone else should not tell you who you want to be or what you should be or do.

Not only should you be making the choice about who/what you want to be and what kind of life you want to live, but you should also embrace the personal responsibility of achieving this. No gym, workout, trainer, nutritionist, etc. makes changes in your life; you make the changes. Change comes when you decide you want to make it happen, not when someone else tells you to.

So, spend a little time thinking, imagining about who it is and what it is you really want to be. After you have a clear picture of this, then start thinking about what you WANT to do to make your vision a reality. Take control of your life and then use others to help you stay on track of your vision. Don’t seek out others to tell you what or who you should be.

I believe that people are who they want to be and that change comes when the vision changes inside, not when they get a list of have to’s and should do’s from someone else.

Who do you want to be?

Trainer Tip: Working for health, by Jessica Ray

Sunday, November 14th, 2010

jessica hs


Working for Health

The Center of Disease Control and Prevention projects that in 2010, heart disease will cost the United States $316.4 billion dollars. This total includes the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity in the work place.  Common risk factors for heart disease include inactivity, obesity, hypertension, cigarette smoking, high cholesterol, and diabetes.  Individuals have in their capacity the ability to combat these risk factors head on, and furthermore, reduce the economic impact it has on America.

Many work places have implemented wellness programs as part of their employee benefits packages.  However, many employees are unaware of this opportunity to monitor and improve their health at no additional cost.   Businesses are striving to improve their employees’ health, which in turn, will lower medical costs and absences at work related to illness.  In doing this, companies offer employees the chance to take health assessment surveys to learn more about their health.  By compiling health assessment data, businesses can better assess what their employees’ health concerns are and how they can provide assistance and guidance to improve upon them.  In addition, most wellness packages provide the opportunity for their employees to be contacted by a professional health advisor with whom they can directly discuss their health related issues.  This opportunity grants people the chance to ask how they can improve their health, set realistic goals, and hopefully eliminate additional risk factors that may lead to harmful diseases and/or conditions.  Some companies may also offer onsite resources such as health screenings, fitness facilities, and health educational seminars.  This makes it easier for employees to designate time during their work day to focus on their health.

Even though the work place is making it easier for individuals to be healthy, it is important for people to take actions in their own hands.  The expense of gym memberships, diet groups, and healthy foods makes it hard to stay in shape.  Instead of joining a gym think about other ways to exercise.  Find a local church that provides inexpensive fitness classes.  Possibly explore walking trails in your neighborhood, or ask a friend who has knowledge in fitness to help you.  There are many creditable exercise videos that can be purchased at a reasonable cost as well.  Exercise videos are very convenient since you can perform your exercise routine right in your own home.  This helps people overcome the intimidation of a gym atmosphere.
As an exercise specialist, I have discovered the barriers that people face with their health.  As people continue to become more and more unhealthy there will be a significantly greater economic impact.  This is why it’s important to take advantage of all the opportunities that can help improve our community’s wellbeing.