Archive for the ‘Rob Sweet’ Category

Trainer Tip: Kids and summer vacation

Monday, August 12th, 2013

How your kids should spend summer vacation

by Rob Sweet, Fitness Plus Personal Trainer
 

Recent research has shown that K-12 kids lose so much knowledge and academic skills during the summer break that the first two to three months of the next school year are primarily used for catching up.  Likewise, during summer vacation, the usual answer to the familiar essay question “What I Did Over Summer Vacation” is . . . nothing.

And that’s especially true for kids’ bodies.  Research also demonstrates that K-12-ers are sleeping around nine hours a night and using electronic devices—that’s cellphones, TVs, tablets, computers, etc.—for another nine.  That doesn’t leave a whole lot of time in the day for exercise.

Ask your grandparents, or even parents, what they did during these 10-12 weeks, and they’ll likely talk about getting up at the crack of day and riding their bikes off to play or even going to summer camps.  In other words, they naturally got the requisite amount of exercise.

And that exercise, as neuroscientist John Medina points out in Brain Rules (2008), helped in turn to boost their brain power.

Let’s encourage kids to get back outside.  When I was a kid, I spent my summers riding around Richmond on my bike, which built up my legs and my cardio.  I also attended sports camps and, like every Kentucky kid used to, played hoops on my driveway court.  When August came and school opened, my brain was in almost as good shape as my body.

What should today’s kids be doing in the summer?  Exercise.  Recent guidelines suggest that EVERYONE ought to get 30 minutes of exercise a day, even if it’s in two 15-minute spurts.  Another useful guideline is the doctrine of 10,000 steps—that means walking about four miles a day.

Then there’s strength. All kids should develop a love for building muscle and why it will help them with their journey through life. There are some simple ways young kids can start to develop muscular strength. I myself, start my young clients with body weight activities:

  • Push-ups- This exercise will develop the chest and arms while working the mid-section as well.
  • Pull-ups- Will help them build the muscles of the back and arm
  • Squats- Work the muscles of the legs while helping with balance and stability

Not sure of the proper way to perform these exercises?  Consider a trainer.  An experienced professional not only ensures you do the exercises the proper way, but optimizes your efforts.  A professional personal trainer can also develop a well- rounded fitness program, including nutritional counseling.  Remember, you’re up against the armies of the fast-food nation, and grilling at home together has not been outlawed.  Sticking with your solid proteins such as chicken, turkey, and fish is always a healthy option. Also, feeding those brains and bodies their daily fruits/veggies is essential to a well-rounded meal.

And it’s not too late to get started with exercise and a personal trainer.  Those ever-shortening summer days are whispering that the start of the school year isn’t far off.  After all, when they write those September essays on “How I Spent My Summer Vacation,” you don’t want them drooling about the Pretzel Burger at Wendy’s, boasting about the number of new BFFs who friended them, or how they watched the Glee CDs so often they’ve memorized the entire playlist.

SUSPEND YOUR DISBELIEF . . . AND YOUR BODY

Monday, November 12th, 2012

Rob Sweet

Tired of traditional resistance training with the same old barbells, dumbbells, and bands?  Aired it out about aerobics?  Had enough Pilates?  Well, we’ve got a new type of training that’s not only cutting edge, but highly effective in allowing for your creativity and developing the totality of one’s overall body stability.

Suspension Training is a form of resistance training that includes bodyweight exercises in which a variety of multi-planar [many planes of the body], compound exercises movements can be performed (see Wikipedia).  Suspension training develops:

  • Strength
  • Balance
  • Flexibility, and
  • Joint stability.

Many aspects of suspension training are beneficial for the body; it develops core body strength, as well as joint and muscular stability. However, I must warn you of the criticisms toward this particular type of training. Many argue that some less fit individuals do not have the core or joint stability to preform suspension exercises properly. There is good news however. A personal trainer can develop a safe and effective suspension workout based on the individual’s strength and overall fitness level.

If you want to add some variety to your routines or just had your curiosity piqued, let us know.  Being suspended can be a good thing.

Strong Over 50: video

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

Fitness Plus
831 National Ave.
Lexington, KY 40502
859.269.9280

 

Rob Sweet, personal trainer at Fitness Plus in Lexington, Ky., shows off a new workout routine he came up with for the “Strong Over 50” exercise equipment.

Check it out.

 

 

 

 

CRUNCH TIME

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

Rob Sweet

One in three kids is obese, and by 2020 half our country is estimated to be grossly overweight.

Parents have taught their children about financial wellness and the need for a good education, but have failed miserably in health and wellness education.  Let’s get to the youth of America while we still have a chance to head off the epidemic of type two diabetes that will not only hinder our bodies, but will put a strain on our personal and national debt.

Good health education starts at home with parents encouraging, teaching, and modeling proper nutrition and exercise.  Yes, schools provide some exercise, but physical education and the arts are usually among the first cuts to the K-2 curriculum.

So now, parents, its crunch time in more ways than one.  What can you as do to educate your children about physical wellness?

Start your child in various physical activities at a young age.  Respect that kids don’t like the same things as other kids or even you, the parent. Make sure you expose them to a variety of team and individual activities so they can discover what they like.  Do all kids have to play organized sports?  No, the world of dance offers classes from ballet to hip-hop to ballroom.

Make your home a sports complex.  Like most kids in Kentucky, I grew up with a basketball goal beside the driveway.  I also had a clubhouse with a ladder to the second floor, a zip-line, and a swing-set.  Any one of these things would have been enough, especially if the garage were stacked with the equipment necessary to play these games.  Heck, my mom even had a croquet set I could use.

As the child grows, as early as 10 or 11 you can enroll them with a personal trainer.  No, boys can’t really weight train properly until they pass the Hair Test (i.e., they begin to sprout body hair), but if they learn the proper techniques early, they won’t hurt themselves later.  Youth coaches may well be able to teach your kid to hit a free throw or a curve ball, but few have taken the necessary coursework to learn about effective strategies with plyometrics, resistance bands, or body weight exercises.

Look at the future and act in the present.

One Kid’s Journey: Words from Fitness Plus personal training client, Tom Cooper

Sunday, August 8th, 2010

The following are the words of 17 year old, Fitness Plus client, Tom Cooper. Tom wanted to write about his personal weight loss journey that he has been on for the last 9 months. Tom has worked with his trainer, Rob Sweet, to accomplish losing 60 pounds and increasing his overall fitness. Congratulations to Tom for his hard work and dedication and to Rob for helping Tom reach his goals.

push up

bench press

From Tom Cooper:

A year ago I was a chubby kid who was wishing for more stamina and I was wishing for me to slim down. I started coming to fitness plus about 9 months ago and after each workout that Rob Sweet designed for me, I felt like I was improving each time. I have lost around 60 pounds in my time working at fitness plus without dieting. I have gone from not being able to do an accurate push up, to now having push ups be one of the easiest exercises for me. Without Rob’s help, I would have not been able to learn the right ways to do all the exercises that helped me achieve my current weight. If I knew that I
was capable of loosing the weight I lost in the amount of time I lost it, I would’ve started a lot earlier.

(for more information about Fitness Plus personal training in Lexington, KY, please visit our website. Get great fitness tips and community information by becoming a fan on our Facebook page)